Information

Statistical Facts About Cambodia

  • Country Conventional Name - Kingdom of Cambodia (Locally called Preahreacheanachak Kampuchea). In short by local: Kampuchea
  • Capital - Phnom Penh
  • Location - Southeast Asia, bordering by the Gulf of Thailand to the Southwest, Thailand to the North and West, Laos to the North, Vietnam to the East and South.
  • Climate - Tropical
  • Rainy Season - June to October
  • Cool Season - November to February
  • Hot Season - March to May
  • Monsoon season - May to November); Dry season (December to April) - Average Temperature: 27 degree Celsius
  • Land Areas - 181,035 square kilometers, with a coastal line of 443 km.
  • Population - 13,900,520, Khmer 90%, Vietnamese 5%, and Chinese, Chams (Khmer Island), Hilltribes, Chinese constituted remaining 5%, Population growth rate: 2.49% (1999 est.)
  • Birth rate - 41.05 births/1,000 population (1999 est.)
  • Death rate - 16.2 deaths/1,000 population (1999 est.)
  • Military Age - 18 years of age
  • Religion - Officially Theravada Buddhism 95%; others Islam and Christianity
  • Language - Officially Khmer - others: English, French, Chinese and Vietnamese       Literacy: 35% of the total population
  • Time - +7 GMT
  • Communication - Handphone has become a necessity in Cambodia. Handphone numbers start with 011, 012, 015, 016 or 018. Phone cards can be bought at hotels post offices and supermarkets for use at public phones.
  • Economy (Estimated): GDP: purchasing power parity—$7.8 billion (1998 est.),       Agriculture: 51%
  • Industry - 15%
  • Services - 34%
  • Inflation rate - 15% (1998)
  • Labor force - 2.5 million to 3 million
  • Labor force - agriculture 80%
  • Industries - rice milling, fishing, wood and wood products, rubber, cement, gem mining, textiles
  • Natural Resources - Timber, gemstones, some iron ore, manganese, phosphates, hydropower potential.
    The Kingdom of Cambodia, formerly Kampuchea, is a Southeast Asian nation that borders Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and the Gulf of Thailand. The capital city is Phnom Penh.
  • Geography - Situated in the southwest of the Indochinese peninsula, Cambodia occupies a total area of 181,035 square kilometers and borders Thailand to the west and northwest, Laos to the northeast, Vietnam to the east, and the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest. Cambodia’s geographic coordinates are 13 00 N, 105 00 E.Cambodia’s terrain consists mainly of low plains, with mountains to the southwest and north. Two dominant physical features of Cambodia are the Mekong river, which runs from north to south of the country, and the Tonlé Sap Lake. Natural resources include oil and gas, timber, gemstones, iron ore, manganese, phosphates, hydropower potential.
  • Population - Cambodia’s population is approximately 14 million. Ninety percent of residents are Khmer; the rest are Cham (Khmer Muslim), Chinese, Vietnamese, Indian, Thai, Phnorng, Kuoy, Stieng, Tamil, etc. The population density is 78/ km2.
  • Climate - Like most of Southeast Asia, Cambodia’s climate is hot and warm almost all year round. The climate is dominated by the annual monsoon cycle of rainy and dry seasons. The rainy season lasts from May to October and the dry season from November to April. December to January are the coolest months, while the hottest period is in April. The average temperature is around 27-28ºC.
  • National Flag - The flag of Cambodia symbolizes the country’s slogan: Nation, Religion, King. The two large blue stripes represent royalty and the center red stripe represents the nation. The image of the white temple stands for the nation’s religion.
  • National Flower - The romduol, a small yellowish-white flower, is the national flower of the Kingdom of Cambodia. Since ancient times, Cambodian women have often been compared to the Romduol flower because of its attractive fragrance; a unique scent that is prominent in the late afternoon and can travel over long distances with the wind. With its sturdy stems that measure up to 30cm, the Romduol plant can grow to a height of 12 meters. These plants are being planted to enhance public parks.

Theravada Buddhism is the prevailing official religion in Cambodia and approximately ninety percent of the population is Buddhist. Islam, Hinduism, and Christianity are also embraced in Cambodia. Since Buddha statues and images represent the revered Buddha, visitors are asked to treat all such statues and images with respect, so as not to offend local people. In Cambodia, regardless of religion, the country maintains a harmonized state.

  • The Wet Season - The wet season comes courtesy of the southwest monsoon which blows from May to October, bringing with it some 75% of Cambodia's annual rainfall. Not surprisingly, the wet season is characterized by rain, and during the peak of the wet season from July to September it can rain as much as two out of every three days. However, the rainy days are usually just a few hours of heavy downpour and not all-day rain, although the latter does occur. From a more cheerful perspective, monsoonal Cambodia is also a beautiful country to travel around in. The roads are not dusty and the lush greenery of the country returns. Angkor Wat, in particular, can be stunning during the wet season -- the murals have a more unique appearance and feel. Observing Angkor Wat with a lightning storm as a backdrop is an electrifying experience. There are also fewer tourists going about in the country, so if you prefer to dodge the crowds, the wet season can be a good time to visit. Regionally, the Cardamom Mountains get the heaviest rain in the country, while the entire coastline gets rough seas and a lot of rain.
  • The Dry Season - The dry period runs from October to April, when the dusty northeast monsoon arrives. Blowing like a hair-dryer set to high, the northeast monsoon dries out the country very quickly. While November and January are quite cool (high C20s) by April, the weather can be scorching and very dry. Characterized by heat and dust, this season coincides with Cambodia's peak tourist season when travelers arrive in their droves between November and January to take advantage of the lack of rain, enjoy the sun and the relatively cooler months. Cambodia's beach strips at Kep, Sihanoukville and Ko Kong bask in brilliant sunshine with clear calm waters and if you're a beach person, the dry season is the best time for you.
  • Khmer History - The race that produced the builders of Angkor developed slowly through the fusion of the Mon-Khmer racial groups of Southern Indochina during the first six centuries of the Christian era. Under Indian influence, two principal centers of civilization developed. The older, in the extreme south of the peninsula, was called “Funan” (the name is a Chinese transliteration of the ancient Khmer form of the word “Phnom”, which means “hill”). Funan was a powerful maritime empire that ruled over all the shores of the Gulf of Siam. In the mid-sixth century, the Kambuja who lived in the middle Mekong (north of present-day Cambodia), broke away from Funan. Within a short period, this new power known as Chenla, absorbed the Funanese Kingdom. In the late seventh century, Chenla broke into two parts: Land Chenla (to the north) and Water Chenla (to the south along the Gulf of Thailand) dominated by the Chinese. Land Chenla was fairly stable during the 8th century, whereas Water Chenla was beset by dynastic rivalries. During this period, Java invaded and took control of part of the country.
  • At the beginning of the ninth century - the kings set up their respective capital in the present province of Siem Reap. For nearly six centuries, the kings enriched it by building temples one after another and each being more sumptuous than the other. Two hundred of these temples are spread all over in the Angkorian area some 400 square kilometers in the Siem Reap Province. The temples and their sanctuaries are best known for their architecture and sculptures.
  • The first founder of Angkor was King Jayavarman II (802-850) - who built one of his residences on the plateau of the Kulen in 802. King Indravarman I (887-889), a nephew of King Jayavarman II, constructed a vast irrigation system at Lolei and then built the tower of Preah Ko in 879 and Bakong in 881. King Yasovarman (889-900), the son of King Indravarman I, dedicated the towers of Lolei to his memory in 893 and founded a new capital to the northwest which was to remain the very heart of Angkor. He built the Eastern Baray, a 7km X 2km size artificial lake also.
  • King Harshavarman I (900-923) - the son of King Yasovarman, who took to the foot of Phnom Bakheng, consecrated the little temple of Baksei Chamkrong, and built Prasat Kravan in 921. King Jayavarman IV (928-941), uncle of King Harshavarman I, reigned in northeastern Cambodia near the present town of Koh Ker. He erected several majestic monuments. King Rajendravarman (944-968) returned to Angkor in 952 and built the Eastern Mebon and Prè Roup in 961. In 967, the Brahman Yajnavaraha, a high religious dignitary of royal blood, erected the temple of Banteay Srei, about 20 km northeast of the capital. King Jayavarman V (968-1001) founded a new capital around Takeo Temple.
  • In the eleventh century, King Suryavarman I (1002-1050) - seized Angkor and founded a glorious dynasty. It was at this time that the Gopura of the Royal Palace of Angkor Thom was completed with the sober pyramid of the Phimeanakas at its center. He also erected the temple of Phnom Chiso, some parts of Preah Vihear, and Preah Khan in Kampong Svay District.
  • King Udayadityavarman II (1050-1066) - son of king Suryavarman I, built the mountain temple of Baphuon and Western Baray. King Udayadityavarman's brother, King Harshavarman III, succeeded him and ruled from 1066 to 1080 when violent strife led to the fall of the dynasty. King Jayavarman VI (1080-1113) continued to build Preah Vihear Mount in Vat Po and Phimai.
  • King Suryavarman II (1113-1150) - extended his power from the coast of the China Sea to the Indian Ocean and built the temples of Angkor Wat, Thommanon, Chau Say Tevoda, Preah Palilay, Preah Pithu, and Banteay Samrè. After these dazzling achievements, the Khmer civilization began to decline due to internal strife and an attack by the Chams.
  • King Jayavarman VII (1181-1220) - was the most fascinating personality in Khmer history. He re-established his rule over all of southern Indochina and is best known for his huge building program. He built Ta Prohm (1186) and Preah Khan (1191) as a dedication to his parents. Then he erected Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang, the Terrace of the Leper King, the Terrace of the Elephants, Neak Pean, Ta Saom, Ta Nei, and a few monuments in other parts of the country. It was he who founded his great capital, Angkor Thom and in the center of which, he built the Bayon temple with its two hundred stone faces.
  • It is understandable - that the country was exhausted after these enormous efforts. The decline of the Angkor era began after the death of King Jayavarman VII in the early thirteenth century. Due to Siamese invasion and the limitations of the irrigation system, Khmer power declined so drastically that the king was finally obliged to move to the vicinity of Phnom Penh in 1431. Then, resulting from a series of Siamese and Cham invasions, the country was placed as a French protectorate in 1863.
  • After regaining Independence in 1953, the country resumed several names:
    1. The Kingdom of Cambodia (under the Reachia Niyum Regime from 1953 to 1970)
    2. The Khmer Republic (under the Lon Nol Regime from 1970 to 1975)
    3. Democratic Kampuchea (under the Pol Pot Genocidal Regime from 1975 to 1979)
    4. The People's Republic of Kampuchea (1979-1989)
    5. The State of Cambodia (1989-1993)
    6. The Kingdom of Cambodia (1993 until now).
  • Customs and Tradition – Cambodian culture and tradition have had a rich varied history dating back many centuries. Over the years, the people of Cambodia developed a set of unique tradition from the syncretism of indigenous Buddhism and Hinduism.Cambodians have been raised to respect their culture and are very traditional in their way of life. Tourists will see the well mannered Cambodian expressing a friendly “Chumreap Suor” when they meet one.
  • Chumreap Suor – Cambodians traditionally greet with a Sampeah, which involves pressing the palms together before the chest with a slight bow and greeting with a polite ‘Chumreap Suor’. Customarily, the higher the hands are held and the lower the bow, the more respect is conveyed. Except when meeting elderly people or government officials, between men, this custom has been partially replaced by the handshake. Women usually greet both men and women with the same traditional greeting. Although it may be considered acceptable for foreigners to shake hands with a Cambodian, it is more appropriate to respect the custom and respond with a ‘Chumreap Suor’.  
  • Traditional Dances – There are many classical dance forms in Cambodia, of which a highly stylized art form was once confined mainly to the courts of the royal palace and performed mainly by females. Known formally in Khmer as Robam Apsara, the dancers of this classical form are often referred to as Apsara dancers.
    This dance form was first introduced to foreign countries and best known during the 1960s as the Khmer Royal Ballet. The first royal ballerina was Princess Norodom Bopha Devi, a daughter of King Norodom Sihanouk.
    The Apsara Dance is particularly inspired by the style from around more than a thousand Apsara carvings in the Angkor temple complex. As evidenced in part by these Apsaras (celestial dancers), dance has been part of the Khmer culture for more than a millennium.
    A visit to Cambodia is only complete when one has attended at least one such traditional dance performance. 
  • Kbach Kun Khmer Boran ( Martial Art ) – Khmer martial arts date back more than a thousand years, as evidenced by carvings and bas-reliefs in the Angkor temples. The martial arts include Bokator, Pradal Serey, Baok Chambab, Kbach Kun Dambong Vèng, amongst others.
  • BokatorBokator –  known formally as Labokatao, is a Cambodian martial art form that involves close hand-to-hand combat, ground techniques and weapons.
    Bokator is one of the earliest Cambodian martial art and is said to be the close quarter combat system used by the armies during the Angkor era.
    Practitioners are trained to strike with knees, elbows, hands, feet and even the head. Short sticks are commonly used as weapon.
  • Baok Chambab – Baok Chambab is Khmer wrestling; a sport in which two opponents try to pin (hold) each other’s back to the ground. A match consists of three rounds. Wrestlers perform pre-match ritual dancing. A wrestler wins a match by two out of three rounds. However, after each round, the loser is asked if he still wishes to continue with the match.
    A Baok Chambab match is traditional accompanied by drum beats; two drums known as Skor Nhy and Chhmol, (female drum and male drum).
    Traditional matches are held at the Cambodian National Olympic Stadium during the Khmer New Year and other Cambodian holidays.
  • Kbach Kun Dambong Vèng – Kbach Kun Dambong Vèng literally refers to an ancient Cambodian martial art form involving the use of a long staff.
    It has traditionally been practiced to prepare against enemies bearing eventual malice towards their villages and their country.
    Now, it is particularly popular with youths in main sports clubs in Cambodia.
  • Pradal SereyPradal Serey – is traditional Khmer kick boxing. A match consists of five rounds and takes place in a boxing ring. There is a one or two-minute break in between each round. Before a match, boxers perform the praying rituals known as the Kun Krou. Traditional Cambodian music is played during a match. The instruments used are the Skor Yaul (a drum), the Sralai (a flute-like instrument) and the stringed Chhing. Boxers are required to wear leather gloves and shorts.
    Victory is instantaneously granted when a boxer delivers a knockout which is determined when the knocked down boxer is unable to continue the fight after a 10-second count by the referee. Victory is also determined at the end of the match when judges decide by a point system which fighter was more effective. If the fighters end up with the same score, a draw is called.  
  • Khmer Wedding – Traditional Cambodian weddings are intricate affairs that consist of multiple ceremonies lasting three days and three nights. The wedding begins with the groom and his family traveling to the bride’s home bearing gifts to the bride’s family as dowry. Family members and friends are introduced, and wedding rings exchanged. Customarily, three traditional songs accompany this first segment; the first song announcing the arrival of the groom and the next is on the presentation of the dowry followed by a final song to invite the elders to chew Betel Nut, an age-old Khmer tradition. Then it is the Tea Ceremony, at which the bride and groom offer tea to the spirits of their ancestors.
    To prepare the bride and groom for their life as a married couple, their hair must then be symbolically cut to represent a fresh start to their new relationship together as husband and wife. The master of ceremony performs the first symbolic hair cut; the bride and groom’s parents, relatives, and friends then take turn to symbolically cut the bride and groom’s hair and give them blessing and good wishes.
    The final is the most memorable segment of the wedding. Family members and friends take turns to tie the bride’s and groom’s left and right wrists with ‘blessing strings’. The praises and wishes of happiness, good health, success, prosperity, and long-lasting love are acknowledged and witnessed by the loud sound of the gong and joyful cheers. Then, they throw palm flowers over the new couple accompanied by a traditional song. After the couple is pronounced husband and wife, the groom holds the bride’s fabric into the bridal room accompanied by a traditional song.
    At the close of this wedding ceremony, all of the guests are invited to a wedding reception accompanied by an orchestral concert. The Khmer wedding is a rowdy and joyous event.
    Nowadays most families reduce the three-day and three-night ritual to a one-day affair.  
  • Traditional Medicine – The Khmer traditional medicine is a form of naturopathy using natural remedies, such as roots, barks, leaves and herbs to motivate the body’s vital ability to heal and maintain itself. It has been used to treat various diseases for many years. The ancient Khmer people first formulated this medical lore during the Angkor period. It offers a holistic approach avoiding the use of surgery and drugs. Practitioners of this therapy are known locally as Krou Khmer.
    Khmer traditional doctors are receiving recognition and training from the government at the National Center of Traditional Medicine. Medical books in Pali text have been gathered from all the pagodas throughout the country; collated and interpreted into the Khmer language at the center. The center welcomes traditional healers from across the kingdom to share knowledge and train healers to a uniform level and to assimilate their localized knowledge.

Traditional Cambodian arts and crafts including silk weaving, silverwork, stone carving, wood carving, lacquerware, pottery, ceramics, temple murals, basketry and kite-making have evolved from ancient times. A tradition of modern art began in Cambodia in the mid-twentieth century. The contemporary visual arts scene in Cambodia has experienced an artistic escalation.

Many farmers have expanded to weave baskets, make pots, and breed silk worms to produce silk for weaving. In recent years, more sculptors and painters have surfaced to produce marvelous pieces for tourists to take home. Silk weaving in Cambodia has a long history. The practice dates to as early as the first century when textiles were used in trade. Modern textile production skillfully mimics these historic antecedents and produce beautiful motifs that echo clothing details on ancient stone sculptures. By tourists’ demand, skill workers are producing silverwork in the forms of jewelry, souvenir items, especially boxes adorned with fruit and Angkor-inspired motifs. Usually the men produce most of the forms for such work and the women complete the intricate filigree.

Efforts to restore Angkor resulted in a new demand for skilled stone carvers to replace missing or damaged pieces and from that, a new tradition of stone carving has risen in recent years. While some modern carvings remain traditional-style, some carvers have been successfully producing contemporary designs to satisfy market demands.

Cambodian artists make beautiful kites. Kite-making and kite-flying tradition dates back many centuries and was revived in the early 1990s. It is now extremely popular throughout the country. Cambodian Kite-makers cleverly attach a bow to the kites and it resonates in the wind producing a musical sound. Many tourists take home with them such a kite as souvenir.

The village of Koh Anlong Chen (Chinese Island) on the Tonle Sap and the province of Kandal are especially renowned for skilled copper artisans. Their skill has been passed down from generation to generation.

These craftmen cut and carve flattened copper into decorative art pieces. Pots, bowls, plates, ornamental swords, bracelets, and other souvenir items are crafted from flattened copper. While copper decorative swords are popular for Khmer weddings, copper-made decorative pots and bracelets are popular tourist souvenirs.

FESTIVITIES

The Kingdom of Cambodia has a wealth of traditional and cultural festivals dated according to the Cambodian lunar calendar. All of these festivals are influenced by the concepts of Buddhism, Hinduism, and royal cultures. The festivals, which serve as a source of great joy, merriment and Cambodia’s national colors, play a major role in influencing tourists’ opinions, behaviors, and options. Most of these are a time of great rejoicing for the predominantly urban and the rural populace. Nowadays the whole nation unites in understanding its cultural values and traditions. On these pages, are some of the important celebrations organized during the year. 

  • The Khmer New Year - or 'Bon Chol Chhnam Thmei' in the Khmer language, is commonly celebrated on 13th April each year although sometimes the holiday may fall on the 14th April in keeping with the Cambodian lunar calendar. This marks the end of the harvest season when farmers enjoy the fruits of their labor and relax before the start of the rainy season. The New Year holidays last for three daysDuring this time, people engage in traditional Khmer games; they paly such games as the Bas Angkunh 'seed throwing', Chaol Chhoung 'twisted-scarf throwing', Leak Kanséng 'twisted-scarf hide', tug of war, shuttlecock kicking, etc. Throughout the country, people merrily dance the traditional Khmer forms of the Ran Vong, Ram Kbach, Saravan, and Lam Leav in the open.
  • The Royal Ploughing Ceremony - or 'Bon Chroat Preah Nongkoal' in the Khmer language, is solemnly celebrated at the beginning of the sowing and planting season. Every year in May, this cultural ceremony takes place at the park in front of the National Museum (next to the Royal Palace). Cambodia has deep connection with earth and farming. There is a deep astrological belief that royal oxen known in Khmer as Usapheak Reach, have an instrumental role in determining the fate of the agricultural harvest each year.Traditionally, the King Meak, representing the king of Cambodia, ploughs the field whilst the Queen, the Preah Mehuo, sows seeds from behind. The field is ceremoniously ploughed three times around. The royal servants then drive the royal oxen to seven golden trays containing rice, corn, sesame seeds, beans, grass, water, and wine to feed. The royal soothsayers interpret what the oxen have eaten and predict a series of events including epidemics, floods, good harvests, and excessive rainfall. At this festival, both men and women wear brightly colored Khmer traditional costume.
  • Pchum Ben or All Souls Day - Running for 15 days, usually from the end of September into October, this festival is dedicated to blessing the spirits of the dead and is one of the most culturally significant in Cambodia.  The exact date defers year to year as determined by the lunar calendar.  Each household visits their temple of choice and offers food to the monks.Offering of food is a meritorious act and is one of the oldest and most common rituals of Buddhism. During the Pchum Ben festival, people bring food to the temple for the monks and to feed hungry ghosts who could be their late ancestors, relatives or friends. Pagodas are usually crowded with people taking their turn to make offerings and to beg the monks to pray for their late ancestors and loved ones. Many remain behind at the temple to listen to Buddhist sermons.Footnote:-"Hungry ghost" is one of the six modes of existence in the ‘Wheel of Life’. Hungry ghosts or ‘Preta’ which means ‘departed ones’ in Sanskrit, are pitiable creatures with huge, empty stomachs and pinhole mouths; their necks are so thin they cannot swallow, so they remain hungry.  It is believed that beings are reborn as hungry ghosts because of their greed, envy and jealousy.Cambodians leave food offerings on altars and around temple grounds for hungry ghosts.  Pchum Ben is a festival that features food and entertainment for such hungry ghosts.
  • The Water Festival - a spectacle to behold, is probably the most exorbitant festival held each year in November. It is usually celebrated for three days, i.e. the 14th and 15th of the waxing moon and the 1st of the waning moon of the month of Kadek. The 15th of the waxing moon is the last full moon day.The festival ushers in the fishing season, marks a change in the flow of the Tonlé Sap and the ebbing-water season, and is seen as thanksgiving to the Mekong River for providing the country with fertile land and abundant fish.At the height of the rainy season, the water of the Mékong River forces the Tonlé Sap to reverse its current and to flow up to the Tonlé Sap Lake. As the water of the Mékong River begins to subside, the swollen Tonlé Sap Lake flows back to the Mékong River through the Tonlé Sap and empties into the sea, which leaves behind vast quantities of fish. This, indeed, is a remarkable phenomenon of the Tonlé Sap.
    OTHER EVENTS
  • Johnnie Walker Cambodian Open golf tournament - Cambodia is regular host to the Johnnie Walker Cambodian Open golf tournament. There are many golf courses in Cambodia; all of which are of international standard. The Angkor Golf Resort is designed by six-time big winner Nick Faldo and it is claimed that this course could emerge as not only the finest in Cambodia, but one of the best in the Asia-Pacific region. This 18-Hole course is a challenging 7279 yards, par 72 that is built to challenge all levels of golfers and has been rated by the US PGA.
  • Angkor Wat International Half Marathon - Cambodia is also host to the Angkor Wat International Half Marathon annually. The event attracts thousands of runners from more than 40 countries around the world.

Khmer is the official language of Cambodia. The Cambodian language is derived from the Mon-Khmer (Austro-Asiatic) language family. Khmer is renowned for possessing one of the largest sets of alphabets; it consists of 33 consonants, 23 vowels, and 12 independent vowels. While tourists may wish to learn a few spoken phrases before or when visiting Cambodia, English is widely spoken and understood. French and Mandarin are also spoken frequently in the country; most elderly Cambodians speak French and many people in the Khmer-Chinese population speak Mandarin.

  • PRAHOK KTIES – Prahok Kties is a delicious staple dish of Cambodian cuisine. Prahok, which means fermented fish, is GOLD to Cambodian cuisine, and can take up different shapes of flavor, depending on the recipe. Prahok Kties is fried with pork taken from the belly sides of the hog, which accentuates the flavor, particularly with the amazing quality of pork (sakchru) that Cambodia produces. It leaves you with an amazing taste in your palates.
  • MACHU KROUNG – Machu Kroung (soup), a healthy, fulfilling, flavorful sweet and sour soup that is incredibly wholesome. The fried peanuts accentuate the soup. The lemongrass (slak krai) and the saffron truly complement each other and to top it off, the decorative local grown chili flakes (matey) make this quite an appealing site to the eye. This is in fact more towards a curry than it is the soup that most foreigners thought it to be.
  • KORKO – Korko, the hearty traditional gravy is truly quite delightful; its base ingredient is actually toasted rice pounded and turned into a tasty base and complimented by prahok, pork and pumpkin, which together add a delicious warmth and texture to the palate. Korko, is one of those great fusions of traditional ingredients cooked to perfection.
  • CHA TRA KUN – Morning glory (tra kuen), amongst one of the most treasured vegetables in Cambodia, with its richness in flavor and vitamins attributed to the rich soil which it is grown in. The delicious essence of the oyster sauce, truly compliments this delicious leafy and abundant vegetable.
  • NOM BAN CHOK – (Cambodian noodle), is one of the favorites for locals and tourists in Cambodia. The essence of curry combines beautifully with the noodles and the texture of the vegetables: morning glory, cucumber, sprouts, and string beans and to spice it up, add a little matey (chili). The look of it is quite appealing with the decorative prolot (lotus stem), which is a beauty of nature, attractive to the eye and fulfilling to the appetite.
  • BRO HEOR – This delicious parade of flavors come together in this delicious soup, with yes, the most popular ingredient being the base, prahok. It is a soup that is a meal in itself, consisting of leafy vegetables, such as chili leaves and the exotic various herbs of the Cambodian Kingdom.
  • NHOIM TROYONG CHEIT – Nhoim Troyong Cheit is a delicious and refreshing salad complimented by the tasty banana flower (troyong cheit) accompanied by tasty chopped bits of nuts, onion, lemon and carrot. This dish can be prepared with pork or chicken depending on one's preference. Whatever it is, the Nhoim Troyong Cheit is incredibly refreshing and quite a festival in itself.
  • NHOIM MAKAK – Nhoim Makak, is a delicious combination of dry shrimp, fish, fish sauce, chilli pepper and garlic and the Makak fruit all in one. The festivity of flavors in this mixed salad will awaken your senses. The kiwi-sized Makak (Otaheite Apple) has a pineapple-mango like flavor and crunchy texture that makes this a better preference over using the Mango for this salad.
  • BROHER TROPEAG – Broher tropeang is a refreshing soup. Light, and crisp, the hearty flavor is awarded to the unique flavoring from the green leaves and bamboo shoots. Step into the wilder side by adding prahok, fresh river fish and even smoked fish with mushrooms to spice up the fragrance. For a bit more, the connoisseurs of modern day Cambodia favour a tad bit of chili flakes to give it that extra kick.
  • Plum
  • Feroniella Lucida
  • Pomelo
  • Orange
  • White Leadtree
  • Velvet Tamarind
  • Kapok
  • Willughbeia
  • Lychee
  • Banana
  • Gold Apple (Chan)
  • Wax Apple
  • Coconut
  • Melon
  • Pomegranate
  • Burmese Grape
  • Durian
  • Bilimbi
  • Anthocephalus Cadamba
  • Palm fruit
  • Avocado
  • Bael
  • Eggfruit
  • Jambolan Plum
  • Jujube
  • June Plum
  • Longans
  • Mango
  • Mangosteen
  • Maprang
  • Papaya
  • Persimmon
  • Pineapple
  • Rambutan
  • Santol
  • Sapodilla
  • Soursop
  • Starfruit
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